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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi i'm completely new here, and i'm not very good at art either haha but thought i'd try something new. I can't find an example of the exact thing I'm looking for on the internet Thankfully after scouring for days, finally found this website. Hoozah!

In my head I know what i'm wanting to make and how it should look but am entirely stumped when it comes to equipment I need to get. And also if my "sculpture" will even be structurally sound.

I am wanting to make a figure, only around a foot tall, made from wire. So.. bent and coiled into place. i was going to use a soldering iron, if need be, to help form facial features and buttons and things It's to be quite detailed and verging on delicate

I desperately want to smooth out the gaps (or bumps) between each layer/coil of the wire so that it's extremely smooth..silky smooth and almost polished by the time I'm finished, possibly.
Hopefully without soldering, as I think that would add bulk to it .. I'd prefer to melt one strand of coil to the next,above and below, and only wanted to add this solder stuff if I reeally have to.

I have the issue that i have a very, very confined craft space, and don't want to have actual flames on the go as it's just too hazardous.

Sorry long post. In short, is there a tool that heats up enough to melt say steel or copper with out having to use the solder stuff ..or does the solder evaporate when zapped??

Sorry if i've worded this terribly and makes no sense as I said, i'm no artist But I've had this image in my head for months now, so if there's anything, anyone can suggest as a starting point for me i would be so superly grateful.
Cat
 

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welcome to the forum, Cat. What do you do for a living ?
you have so many things going on against you.
1. you can see what you want but we can't
2. you have no soldering experience. (electric or gas torch).
3. you can not "melt" one metal into another on the hobbyist level.
4. copper is a hard yet soft metal. not easily worked by hand without leaving tool marks.
5. lots and lots of sanding and buffing by electric tools, which I think you don't have.
when you can put a drawing on paper that gets your thought process clear enough for us to understand, please come back and we can possibly help you get started in something that is within your skill sets what tools you have access to.
one option just for practice is to get some modeling clay and try to make something that you like.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Rather discouraging but thank you. Does sound like i'm very disorganized haha.
Ah yes, to be honest it doesn't need made in a hurry, and would prefer to take my time buffering it down and smoothing it out to make it just right but only have an old Dremel and elbow grease.

Design wise, it's a man putting a helmet on Sounds terribly boring, but there's a backstory to it and my friend I'd gift it to would love it ..I hope.

As for clay, I did make this (hopefully the photos attach) just over 2 years ago. I knitted the little branches. I couldn't buy paint brushes locally so had to use cotton buds. My friend loved it but sadly the original one I made him, fell and broke, so this replacement was rushed to be made on time But it was so fun to make.

I always assumed a soldering iron would heat and melt the metal, and you'd have an opportunity to work with it until it cooled. Wasn't until a few days ago I discovered solder is a thing as well. If there was a convenient tool that did do that, I'd be very happy but guess i'll just try soldering and see how that looks

Thanks for taking time out to reply to me
Toy Wood Gas Art Stuffed toy
Toy Frog Green Textile Purple
 

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look around your home and find some copper wire in the size you need. You may have to strip the covering off most of it. You can get an entry level hobby type soldering iron on Amazon to start with. Many videos on YouTube on how to solder wires together. With some practice, you'll soon get the hang of it and make all kinds of nifty projects with copper wire and solder. You can not solder aluminum - so get copper only. Any questions, please feel free to holler up.
Edit: Depending on where you get it from, some copper wire and metals may have a varnish on it to keep it from oxidizing. This is easily removed with a solvent like acetone or lacquer thinner.
 

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you wount be able to melt metal without huge amounts of heat. to do so you have two options a welder or furnace. Soldering doesnt melt the metals but just sort of glues them together with another metal (mostly tin) which has a relatively low melting point.
If you have limited space and cant use heat i think your only option is to use clay or resin and give it a metalic finish. There are a mumber of metalic paints and sprays available that look like the real thing
 
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