Artist Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

· Registered
Watercolor
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My name is Alyssa and I am seeking feedback. I am self taught and sadly I don't have art friends. Of course my family has positive feedback always. I like to create soft and dreamy art. I hope is that my art gives my audience a chance to breathe.

Title: Delphinium
12x16
Blick primer block 140lb cold press 100% cotton
Cotman watercolors: Dioxazine violet, ultramarine blue, brunt sierra, intense green, alizarin crimson hue
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Hi, sorry for the late response!

This painting is very good, but I think you could improve it by making the colours darker or more vibrant in parts where there is meant to be shadow. Or by using a black pen to trace the edges of the flower’s petals to give it a stronger outline or focus.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Hi, I'd like to begin by saying that the painting is fantastic! The one thing I would point out is the section to the left of the blue flowers, which seems to be lacking contrast and blends into the background. I would recommend sharpening the outline to distinguish it. Also, one of the petals of the blue flower seems to stick out with a dark blue outline, perhaps try blending it out for a more cohesive look.

Hope this helps!
 

· Registered
oil paiting
Joined
·
7 Posts
It looks like an interesting painting. To add to the pieces of advice given above, I would like to suggest maybe making the background a color that contrasts with the painting subject, instead of leaving it white. Maybe in your future works. Keep it up! :cool:
 

· Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Hi Alyssa ~

Apologize for the late response.

I find your colors and composition exhibit a wonderful degree of mastery.

Allow me to draw your attention to another level of presentation...

once you have captured the viewer's eye - keep it swirling around

inside your painting. The longer you can hold the viewer's gaze

inside your painting - the higher your chances go for selling your art

should you at some point wish to do so.

The following 2 adjustments attempt to show how this might be accomplished...

by using darks and lights to force the viewer to 'read your painting from

bottom left, up and around and then - back around.

Adjustment #1
Flower Petal Purple Creative arts Paint


Adjustment explanation ...
Directional move of the viewer's eye ...

Flower Plant Purple Petal Creative arts




Hope you find this suggestion useful.

Best regards -
 

· Registered
Watercolor
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you Picassolite, I am humbled that you took the time to explain with visual guides.

The darkest values are near the bottom corners which is probably leading the eye off the edges. The eye tends to move around to the areas of greatest contrast.

Yes I would love to sell art. Capturing the viewer's eye is a good overall goal.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Hi Alyssa ~

In my workshops I sometimes mention ... 'selling one's art.'

99% of the time the usual response is ... "I paint for fun and usually give my paintings away."

But every once in a while someone says ... "yes, I'd like to sell my work."

So before I deep dive into 'style' or how you separate your paintings from all the floral painters out there...

I want you to take a look at a blog by William Hawkins... especially the one dated Thursday, Dec 13, 2012.

Then take a look at how many years his was blogging, what he was saying, and how he tied his comments
to his paintings. (hint - a picture is worth a thousand words ... especially if it comes with a story.)

Would like to hear your reaction to this blog.

Best regards
 

· Registered
Watercolor
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I thought the landscapes were gorgeous. Most of the paintings have a golden glow against darker blue greens, it's appealing and relaxing.

For the two paintings presented on Dec 13, 2012, the eyes follow the river, the sun, and its reflection. Water and a setting/rising sun are calming. One painting has a strong horizon and bold color choices at the horizon. The other painting shows depth with trees painted with the same flat tonal value in the background.

How do you know the artist?

This year, I'm starting to create landscapes, and fluffy animals.

I'm trying a different process with a landscape piece. Less drawing out every detail, instead I find the big shapes or transitions. Less rushing to finish a painting, I sort of sit with the painting and figure out the next move with patience. I think about how I want the brush to do most of the work for me and how to stack layers of paint.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Hi Alyssa,

Get yourself a cup of whatever and get ready for a slow read ...

My suggestion for you to take a look at Richard Hawkins art blog has many objectives:

1- His use of color versus what other landscape artists are doing.
2- His 'time of day' versus the ordinary high noon landscape lighting.
3- His use of a blog to introduce his art and then direct the viewer to his Ebay sales listings.
[ The value of Ebay is: you can test price and you don't pay a listing fee until and item sells]
4- His use of 'story' to engage and invite the viewer into the artist's world.
5- His actual use of 'story' as a soft sell technique.
6- His use of a blog to capture and build a substantial email list of potential buyers.
[ There is online software to allow you to use your computer as an email server;

#4 is under-utilized in selling art online - but it is one of the most effective sales strategies in any medium.
#6 is the key to future sales as there is a whole strategy built around a 'potential buyer list.'

I do not know Richard Hawkins personally - I just know that when I come across an artist who is selling
like crazy - I like to do a little digging to find out their sales strategy.

Richard Hawkins is not the only artist who is killing it today - I just don't want to overwhelm you - just yet.

The red dots indicate Richard Hawkins sold paintings -

On the internet it is not hard to do - especially if one is like me - with prior experience in the sales game.

So - now you know that I'm really attempting to guide you towards an online sales strategy ...

In a future post we'll take a look at the style of floral art you might consider presenting ...

Best regards,
 

· Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Hi Alyssa,
You have a good sense colour and your use of it to describe form is quite developed in the best tradition. When you show a main subject with a blank or formless plain background your work comes under the title of illustration. This is really to reduce the importance of what is a skillful piece of work. Depth gives a logic and an inner validity to a painting, I think you would find "Composition in Art by Henry Rankin Poore" a very useful reference that would explain better whay I mean. I think you should try and get hold of a copy. If you can't afford that go for my free copy on composition:Into Composition 2019
best wishes
John
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
"doing it wrong teaches you nothing"
What am I saying? what I meant was of course was: Doing it right teaches you nothing, it is doing it wrong that gives you the experience to avoid in future. This only applies if you can learn where you went wrong.
Sorry about that.
John
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top