New Acrylic Painter - Tips Needed - Artist Forum
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post #1 of Old 05-16-2016, 10:29 AM Thread Starter
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New Acrylic Painter - Tips Needed

Good morning everyone,

I am new to the world of painting, specifically acrylics. I read this is the easiest form to start with. I have gathered my supplies and have started doing some simple layering and mixing of colors on small canvas. While it's satisfying, I need some tips on how to get into actual painting. My drawing skills are not so great so I don't think my goal will be to paint actual formations. I am more attracted to abstract painting (always have been).

Can someone please link me to some great sites for beginner abstract acrylic painting with specific steps or projects with a step-by-step? I'm having a hard time finding inspiration but I think that's just because i'm new and as a result, i'm not sure where to begin.

Thank you in advance for any help!
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post #2 of Old 05-16-2016, 10:41 AM
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Welcome to the forum. I can't help you with the specific questions but I can tell you how I started last December. I didn't concern myself too much with perfection. Like others here, I followed some YouTube tutorials and some I repeated because I knew I could do better with the knowledge gained from the first attempt. And my second attempt was always far better than the first. There's a lot to learn and just getting acquainted with your paints and brushes is the first step.

From what I'm told, it's best to have an idea of what you want your painting to express before you start. I didn't on my latest abstract and the results satisfied me. If you start with an idea, don't worry if you change your mind as you go, this is art so have fun with it. Paint a lot.
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post #3 of Old 05-16-2016, 11:39 AM
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Matisse said that one shouldn't wait for inspiration. Just start painting and inspiration will come. At first, you could create a Suprematist piece. It is less complex than Cubism, Rayonism, Futurism, Abstract Expressionism, etc. Suprematism was invented by Kazimir Malevich (1878-1935). It implies painting mostly rectangular forms (but also other forms, such as lines, circles, triangles) on a greyish white background. The advantage with Suprematism is that the result is always decorative and beautiful, and will fit in any home. The following painting is Aeroplane Flying (1915).

YouTube has several instructional videos on acrylic painting. I don't know if they are any good.
https://youtu.be/UazC-VIV-vg

Mats



https://se.pinterest.com/pin/412290540858910556/

Last edited by M Winther; 05-16-2016 at 11:53 AM.
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post #4 of Old 05-16-2016, 12:00 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M Winther View Post
Matisse said that one shouldn't wait for inspiration. Just start painting and inspiration will come. At first, you could create a Suprematist piece. It is less complex than Cubism, Rayonism, Futurism, Abstract Expressionism, etc. Suprematism was invented by Kazimir Malevich (1878-1935). It implies painting mostly rectangular forms (but also other forms, such as lines, circles, triangles) on a greyish white background. The advantage with Suprematism is that the result is always decorative and beautiful, and will fit in any home. The following painting is Aeroplane Flying (1915).

YouTube has several instructional videos on acrylic painting. I don't know if they are any good.
https://youtu.be/UazC-VIV-vg

Mats



https://se.pinterest.com/pin/412290540858910556/
Do you recommend drawing the shapes first and then painting or just freehand paint?
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post #5 of Old 05-16-2016, 12:13 PM
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I recommend painting the whitish surface first, and cover the entire canvas with the paint (tint the white paint with burnt umber, sienna, or whatever). This makes the job easier. After it has dried, you could draw a fine line with charcoal, which is what artists often use. You could use a piece of cardboard and paint along it to get a straight line. There are many methods, of course. The standard method, when painting rectangular shapes or lines, is to use masking tape.

You should probably make a study first. That's what I always do. Malevich used to make studies with a lead pencil on paper. For studies, it is ideal to use crayons.

Mats

Last edited by M Winther; 05-16-2016 at 12:15 PM.
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post #6 of Old 05-16-2016, 12:19 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you - I really appreciate the tips. I'll definitely stop off at Michael's and grab some charcoal. This looks like a good starter piece.
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